Zembla Documentary on Lasik, Pain, and Suicidality

This Lasik documentary was created by investigative journalists in Holland. The language is mostly Dutch, with English subtitles. The documentary focuses on corneal neuropathic path after Lasik and the suicidality it creates. Dutch physician Dr. Michael Brouwer and other Lasik sufferers in Holland are interviewed, as is Dr. Edward Boshnick in the United States (see EyeFreedom.com). The investigators ask: Is the experience of pain after Lasik really uncommon? What are the consequences when it occurs? Also interviewed are Dr. David Barsook and Dr. Morris Waxler. Dr. Barsook is Director of the Pain and Imaging Neuroscience (P.A.I.N.) Group at Boston Children’s Hospital, MGH ,and McLean Hospital at Harvard University. Dr. Barsook maintains that corneal pain after Lasik follows an established model of neuropathic pain. Dr. Morris Waxler is the FDA's former chief research scientist on Lasik. Dr. Waxler maintains at his website HelpStopLasik.com that "The FDA does not want to admit that millions of people have now had a surgery that never should have been approved by its own rules. The FDA is now engaged in covering-up a scandal and an epidemic, and its own corrupt practices. This should be exposed, and LASIK should end." He revisits these conclusions in the video.

Keratoconus

I have Keratoconus, should I have a Transplant?

Should I have a transplant.

Thousands of keratoconus patients each year are advised by their eye doctors to get corneal transplant surgery (keratoplasty). The great majority of this patient population, in reality would do quite well with properly fitted scleral lenses. Keratoplasty is not a “walk in the park.” There are real risks associated with this procedure. The following are the facts associated with keratoplasty:

1. Over 50% of those patients receiving corneal transplant surgery with need scleral lenses in order to achieve visual acuity greater than 20/50. Contrary to what one might think, these lenses are comfortable and very easy to wear.

2. It will take about 1 year for vision to stabilize.

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The GVR Scleral Lens and Keratoconus

Keratoconus is a non-inflammatory ectasia or protrusion of the cornea. Over a period of years (from a few years to 5 or more years) the cornea tends to thin and steepen. As the cornea thins and steepens, the patient will experience a decrease in vision which can be mild or severe. For mild to moderate degrees of keratoconus, eyeglasses or soft contact lenses may be able to provide the patient with clear comfortable vision. However, in the more advanced cases of keratoconus, eyeglasses or soft contact lenses will not be able to provide the patient with clear vision. In addition, conventional gas permeable contact lenses may be able to provide clear vision but these lenses tend to be unstable on an advanced keratoconic cornea.

In the great majority of the patients that we see with advanced keratoconus, the outer cellular layer of the cornea known as the epithelium is compromised or not intact. For this reason patients with advanced keratoconus will not be able to tolerate or support a soft, hybrid or conventional gas permeable lenses. With these lens designs the vision may be acceptable but the comfort will not be. Also, the small gas permeable lenses may tend to pop out of the eye or have excess movement causing discomfort and eye pain after a short wearing period.

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Two photos of Same Keratoconus Eye - Without and With Scleral Lens

These are 2 photos of the same keratoconus eye. The first photo is the eye without a scleral lens. The second is with a scleral lens.



GVR Scleral Lens over Extremely Thin (120 Microns) Keratoconic Cornea

This image shows a scleral lens over a extremely thin (120 microns thick) keratoconic cornea. While this eye never underwent LASIK or any other type of surgery, the purpose is to show how a well fit scleral lens can safely vault over a thinned out cornea. The top 2 lines represent the front and back surfaces of the scleral lens. The thinned out grey structure is the cornea. This patient has been able to successfully wear her scleral lens for the past 3 years. I have never seen a cornea perforated by a scleral lens.

Advanced Keratoconus and Vitrectomy now 20/20 with EyePrint Pro Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with my patient Steve. Steve has an advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes and has been a patient of mine for 15 years. For 15 years, Steve has successfully been wearing scleral lenses in both eyes. Last year Steve had a retinal detachment in his right eye which required retinal surgery and a surgical procedure known as a "vitrectomy". A "vitrectomy" involves the surgical removal of most of the contents within the eye (the vitreous) and replacing it with saline solution. Shortly after the "vitrectomy" procedure, Steve had cataract surgery in the same eye. A few months after the cataract surgery, the intra-ocular lens that was placed in the right eye became dislodged and dropped into the interior of the eye. This required an additional retinal surgery known as a scleral buckle, another "vitrectomy" and another intra-ocular lens insertion procedure. After several months of healing, the time was right to refit the right eye with a scleral lens. However, the multiple surgical procedures performed on Steve's right eye created a severely distorted ocular surface. Besides Steve's cornea being distorted and irregular, the entire white portion of Steve's right eye had numerous "blebs" "bumps" and "depressions". There was no way for any conventional scleral lens to fit on this eye. The front surface of Steve's right eye was one of the most challenging and complicated eyes I have ever worked with. For this reason (4 months ago) we fit Steve's right eye with an EyePrintPro prosthetic scleral lens. To create this lens, we had to make an impression of the front surface of the eye (painless and takes just a few minutes). The impression material was sent to a special laboratory where high tech computerized topographical 3D scanners were used to create a lens with a back surface that matched exactly the front ocular surface of Steve's right eye. Every "hill" and "valley" on the ocular surface of Steve's right eye was imbedded into the back surface of the EyePrintPro Scleral lens. Today, Steve was in for his final follow-up examination. Steve was able to see clearly (20/20) in his right eye today and has been able to wear his EyePrintPro lens all of his waking hours. Without this lens, Steve's vision is less than 20/1000. To witness the vision in Steve's right eye return from virtual blindness to clear comfortable 20/20 vision was one of the greatest joys in my professional career.

Keratoconus Patient now 20/20 with Stable, Comfortable Vision with GVR Scleral Lens

This young woman was first diagnosed with keratoconus when she first enquired about LASIK surgery 14 years ago. LASIK surgery is contraindicated in patients with keratoconus. Over the past 14 years she visited a number of eye doctors, eye clinics and eye institutes seeking help. On a number of occasions she was fit with a variety of gas permeable and soft lenses. The soft lenses provided her did not improve her vision. The gas permeable rigid lenses would pop out of her eyes and were very uncomfortable. In addition, eyeglasses were not able to provide her with functional vision. Fearful that she might eventually need corneal transplant surgery this young woman decided to visit our office for yet another opinion. Several months ago, we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which are providing her with clear (20/20), comfortable, stable vision without any distortions. This young woman will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Fourteen Diopters of Hyperopia Plus Keratoconus, now 20/25 with GVR Scleral Lens

The 18 year old girl standing next to me has 2 separate, rare eye conditions when taken together: a high degree of hyperopia of about +14.00 diopters and keratoconus in both eyes. I have been taking care of this young girl since she was 8 years old. Without corrective lenses her visual acuity is less than 20/800 in each eye. When she was first seen we provided her with soft lenses which corrected her vision to 20/60 in each eye. Until recently she refused to let me fit her with a rigid lens. 2 years ago, when she went to get a driver's permit (needed in Florida before a driver's license) she failed the vision test. It was then that she returned to our office asking for lenses that would allow her to pass the vision test at the motor vehicle testing facility. We fit this young girl with GVR Scleral lenses which are allowing her to see clearly (20/25 in each eye) and comfortably once again with all day lens wear. At her recent visit with us, her corneas were stable and clear and her vision was the same and has not changed over the past 2 years.

Aborted Lasik in 2004 Due to Microkeratome, now 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient visited our office from Denver last week. In 2004, he underwent LASIK surgery in both eyes. During the LASIK surgery on his right eye, the instrument that creates the LASIK flap (the microtome) malfunctioned forcing the procedure to be aborted. Within a 2 year period he had 2 separate LASIK procedures done on his left eye but elected not to undergo any additional surgeries on his right eye out of fear that additional complications might develop. When this patient first entered our office the visual acuity in his right eye was less than 20/800. The visual acuity in his left eye was 20/25 with significant visual distortions known as "higher order aberrations." In addition both eyes always felt uncomfortable and dry. Over the years he visited a number of eye clinics and medical centers in Colorado and the surrounding states seeking help in restoring his vision and ocular comfort. Last week we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses this patient was able to see clearly (20/20) with each eye with excellent comfort and all day lens wear. In addition, all of the visual distortions such as glare, halos and starbursts (known as higher order aberrations) were eliminated. Next to the photo of the patient and me is a digital image of his right cornea. The ill-defined geometric pattern in the center of the photo is the incomplete LASIK flap. The center of this cornea is extremely distorted. The GVR Scleral lens replaces this distorted cornea as an optical surface allowing this eye to see clearly once again.

Keratoconus Patient from Venezuela 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me standing next to my patient visiting from Caracas, Venezuela and her daughter. This lovely woman has suffered from very poor and often painful vision for over 60 years. When this patient first visited our office her visual acuity was 20/150 in her right eye and 20/300 in her left eye. For many years she was wearing hard contact lenses which would ofter pop out of her eyes and be very uncomfortable and often painful to wear. When we first looked at her eyes, both corneas were extremely irritated and scarred from her ill fitting contact lenses. Further into the examination we were able to diagnose both eyes with advanced keratoconus. This patient was never told that she had keratoconus and had never heard the word "keratoconus" before. Earlier this week we fit both of her eyes with GVR Scleral lenses which are allowing her to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably once again with all day lens wear. After she received her GVR Scleral lenses I asked her when was the last time she saw this clearly. Her answer was maybe when she was 8 years old. It is because of patients like this very nice lady that I keep on doing what I have been doing for over 45 years. I feel that it is a great privilege to have played a part in this patient's vision care. I expect her to be able to wear her scleral lenses for many years to come. She will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Transplanted Keratoconus Patient with Hydrops

The patient standing next to me in this photo has an advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes. Earlier this year the pressure within his left eye against a thinned out cornea caused the most posterior membrane in this cornea to tear which allowed fluid from within the eye to enter the center of the cornea. This condition is called "hydrops". This resulted in a cloudy haze directly opposite the pupil in this eye. The visual acuity in his left eye became severely compromised which necessitated the need for a corneal transplant. For a number of years he has been successfully wearing a GVR lens on his right eye which is allowing him to see clearly (20/20 vision) and comfortably with all day lens wear. 6 weeks ago he received a corneal transplant in his left eye. As can be seen in the photo below, the transplanted cornea is clear and no inflammation has taken place in the eye. It is my hope that in 6 or 7 months we will be able to place a scleral lens on this eye. At the present time, this eye has no functional vision. As the healing process takes place over the coming months, stitches may have to be removed causing a change in the shape of the cornea. It is my expectation that once he is fit with a scleral lens his corrected visual acuity will be very close to 20/20.

John Conquers Keratoconus with the GVR Scleral Lens, now 20/20 Each Eye

This is a photo of me with keratoconus patient John. John was first diagnosed with keratoconus about 4 years ago. Prior to being diagnosed with keratoconus, John had difficulty seeing clearly with eyeglasses. As his keratoconus condition progressed, he was fit with a variety of contact lenses including hybrid lenses which he found to be very uncomfortable. In addition to his vision becoming increasingly more blurry, John always felt his eyes to be dry. To stabilize his corneas, last year John had Collagen Cross-Linking done to both of his corneas. Collagen Cross-Linking is done to slow or stop the progression of keratoconus by strengthening the fibers within the cornea. When John first visited our office in November, 2015, his best corrected visual acuity was 20/60 in each eye. Soon after his initial visit with us, we fit both of John's eyes with GVR Scleral lenses. With his new scleral lenses John has clear (20/20), comfortable vision and is able to wear his lenses all of his waking hours. In addition, John's dry eye symptoms disappeared. This is due to the fact that his scleral lenses do not rest on his corneas. Instead the scleral lenses are supported by the white portion of the eye (the sclera). The space between the back surface of the scleral lens and the front surface of the cornea is filled with sterile saline solution which allows the cornea to remain moist. Over the following 6 months Johns eyes were carefully examined at regular intervals. John's vision and corneas have remained stable since receiving his scleral lenses. I expect John to be able to continue wearing his scleral lenses comfortably and with clear vision for many years to come.

Keratoconus Patient from Uruguay With No Functional Vision Now 20/25 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with our student externs Amanda Golchin on the left and Jena Adelsberger on the right. On my left is our keratoconus patient Alvaro, who has been visiting our practice from Montevideo, Uruguay. Alvaro has a very advanced case of keratoconus which cannot be corrected with eyeglasses or conventional contact lenses. I first examined Alvaro in 2009 when we fit him with GVR Scleral lenses. Over these years Alvaro has traveled to Miami 3 times for eye examinations and scleral lens evaluations. Without his scleral lenses, Alvaro has no functional vision. With his GVR Scleral lenses Alvaro is corrected to 20/25 vision in each eye. This week we examined Alvaro once again. Due to a small change in the keratoconic condition of his corneas it was necessary to refit both of Alvaro's eyes with new scleral lenses. Today I asked Alvaro how he functioned with his old hard lenses before coming to visit us 7 years ago, he responded that he had poor vision and that his old lenses "hurt like hell". Before visiting us 7 years ago, Alvaro was told by his doctors back home that he might need to have corneal transplant surgery if he was unable to wear contact lenses. Thanks to his scleral lenses, Alvaro will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient from Chile 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with our 2 student interns, Amanda Golchin on my immediate left and Jenna Adelsberger on the extreme right. In the center is our keratoconus patient, Magela, who has been visiting us from Santiago, Chile. In the background is Angel, Magela's husband. Several years ago, Magela was referred to us for scleral lens fitting by her eye doctor in Santiago. Prior to visiting our office, Magela was unable to see clearly with her eyeglasses and was unable to obtain clear and comfortable vision with any type of contact lens that was given to her back home. On her initial visit with us we were able to provide her with clear and comfortable vision with GVR Scleral lenses. Without corrective lenses, Magela's visual acuity is less than 20/800. With scleral lenses Magela is able to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably with all day lens wear. 2 weeks ago Magela returned for an eye and scleral lens evaluation. Due to a small change in her corneal topographies, a change was made to her scleral lens design. Before visiting us several years ago, Magela was fearful that one day she would need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. Yesterday, Magela returned home with her new scleral lenses. Magela will be able to wear scleral lenses for many more years with clear, comfortable vision. She will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. 

Diagnosed with Keratoconus 40 Years Ago, Now 20/25 in Each Eye with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with my patient Arturo, who visited our office from San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Arturo was diagnosed with keratoconus in both eyes over 40 years ago. 40 years ago, Arturo underwent corneal transplant surgery in his right eye. His left eye has an advanced case of keratoconus. Over the past 40 years, Arturo was unable to have functional vision with eyeglasses and as a result has been wearing hard lenses. Arturo was fit many times with a variety of hard lenses which were very uncomfortable and often painful to wear. Often, Arturo's lenses would pop out of his eyes. When I first met Arturo several months ago, his visual acuity with his hard contact lenses was 20/30 in his right eye and less than 20/200 in his left eye. Several months ago, we fit Arturo with GVR Scleral lenses which have allowed him to see clearly (20/25 in each eye) both at distance and close up and comfortably with all day lens wear. Before coming to Miami, Arturo was fearful that he would need a corneal transplant in his left eye. After evaluating Arturo on a number of occasions over the last few months, I feel that he will be able to wear his scleral lenses with clear, comfortable vision for many years to come. Arturo will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery in his left eye.

Jason from Bahamas 20/20 in Each Eye with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with our student doctors Jena Adelsberger on the left and Amanda Golchin on the right. Standing to my left is our patient Jason, visiting us from Nassau, Bahamas. Jason has an advanced case of keratoconus. Jason first visited our office about 20 years ago. When Jason first came in he was wearing soft lenses which provided him with 20/100 vision. Jason's left keratoconic cornea was much more advanced than his right cornea. Previous doctors advised Jason that he might need to undergo corneal transplant surgery in his left eye. We fit Jason with GVR lenses when he first came in which corrected his vision to 20/20 in each eye. Over the years, we made a number of minor changes to his GVR lenses but his keratoconus has essentially remained the same over the years. Today Jason came in for his yearly eye and vision examination. Jason's corrected visual acuity is still 20/20 in each eye and his specialty lenses are still allowing him to wear his lenses all of his waking hours with excellent comfort. Jason will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery or any other invasive procedure.

Eighty Year Old Patient with Keratoconus 20/25 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with my patient Robert. We recently diagnosed Robert, age 80, with keratoconus. According to Robert, he has always had poor vision. Over the last few years he has noticed that his vision was fluctuating. Another eye doctor here in Miami felt that Robert's symptoms and history did not make sense and decided to refer Robert to our office. Earlier this year we examined Robert at which time a diagnosis of keratoconus was made. At that time we fit Robert with GVR Scleral lenses which have allowed him to see clearly and comfortable once again. Today, when Robert came in for his follow-up vision examination he was able to see 20/25 and a few letters in the 20/20 line. I asked Robert how he felt about his improved vision, he responded that his vision was now "the very best" that he has ever had. It has been my experience that it is very rare to diagnose keratoconus in a patient who is 80 years old, but I have seen this happen. I, along with my assistants and student doctors are extremely happy for Robert.

Patient Diagnosed with Keratoconus 60 Years Ago Receives GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with Guillermo, who suffers from an advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes but with a left eye with an extremely steep and thinned out cornea. Guillermo was diagnosed with keratoconus over 60 years ago. Over these many years he was fit with many different types of hard and soft contact lenses, "piggy back" lenses and hybrid lens designs both in this country and elsewhere. For 50 years, Guillermo suffered from discomfort, often pain, along with blurred vision with all of these lenses. About 10 years ago, we fit Guillermo with GVR Scleral lenses which have allowed him to see clearly (20/25 with his right eye and 20/40 with his left eye) and comfortably with all day lens wear. For the past 10 years, Guillermo's vision and eyes have remained stable. The first image below our photograph was taken with a technology known as "Optical Coherence Tomography" or simply "OCT". In this OCT image, the top 2 curved lines are the front and back surfaces of the scleral lens. The space between the back surface of the lens and the front surface of the cornea is filled with saline solution. The large curved gray structure is the keratoconic cornea. Note how steep the cornea is and how thin it is at the apex. A "normal" cornea is about 550 microns think. This cornea at the apex is about 120 microns thick. Prior to visiting our office, for about 40 years, Guillermo visited 7 world famous eye institutions seeking treatment for his eyes and vision. All of the doctors at these institutions suggested that he receive a corneal transplant on this eye. The last image is a profile photo of Guillermo's left cornea. Because this cornea is so steep, the center of gravity is too far out for this eye to support a conventional gas permeable lens. A scleral lens is the only lens technology that will allow a patient with an eye like Guillermo's to function with clear and comfortable vision once again. This technology is explained at: www.sclerallens.com.

Jessica 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me and my keratoconus patient, Jessica. Jessica has an advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes. 2 weeks ago Jessica traveled to Miami from Santiago, Chile for her annual vision examination. One year ago, we fit Jessica with GVR Scleral lenses. For a few weeks prior to her return visit with us, Jessica was having some comfort and vision issues with one lens. During Jessica's visit with us, we refit her right eye with a new GVR Scleral lens. Essentially, Jessica's eyes changed very little over the last year, however, with her new scleral lenses, Jessica is able to see clearly (20/20 in each eye) and comfortably once again. Prior to Jessica's initial visit with us, both of Jessica's eyes were red and very uncomfortable. Over many years, Jessica tried unsuccessfully to wear a variety of soft and hard contact lenses. Before visiting us for the first time, Jessica was told that if she was not able to wear scleral lenses she would need to have corneal transplant surgery in both eyes. When Jessica recently returned home, both of her eyes were clear. I expect Jessica to be able to wear her scleral lenses comfortably for many years to come. Jessica will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Rachel Seeing 20/20 in Each Eye with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me standing next to my keratoconus patient Rachel. Rachel has been my patient for about 18 years. She has an advanced case of keratoconus which is significantly more pronounced in her left eye. 7 years ago, Rachel underwent Collagen Cross linking in both eyes. At the same time, we fit both of Rachel's eyes with GVR Scleral lenses. Rachel's vision with these lenses is 20/20 in each eye. Without her lenses, Rachel's vision is about 20/800. Conventional contact lenses are not able to provide Rachel with functional vision. Rachel is able to wear her GVR lenses comfortably for all of her waking hours. For the past 7 years, Rachel's eyes have been stable and she is still wearing the same lenses I fit her with 7 years ago. Rachel will be able to wear her scleral lenses for many more years and will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Chilean Patient Seeing 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with my patient Sofia, who recently visited our practice from Santiago, Chile. Sofia has an advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes. For many years she was unable to wear soft lenses or gas permeable lenses. With her prior lenses, Sofia was either comfortable with poor vision or uncomfortable with good vision but was never able to experience good comfort and excellent vision at the same time. In addition, Sofia was unable to function visually at night or in low light environments. 2 years ago, we fit Sofia with GVR Scleral lenses which enabled Sofia to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably once again. Several weeks ago, Sofia visited our practice once again to make sure that her vision and her eyes were stable. A minor adjustment was made to Sofia's scleral lenses, however, Sofia's corneas and vision have essentially remained the same as they were in 2014. Below are photos of the GVR Scleral lenses on both of Sofia's corneas. Note how clear her eyes are. With the lenses that Sofia wore before coming to Miami several years ago, her eyes were always red and irritated. I expect Sofia to be able to wear her Scleral lenses comfortably and with clear vision for many years to come.

Keratoconus Patient from Peru Seeing 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

Standing next to me in the photo below is Claudia, who has been visiting our specialty practice from Lima, Peru. Claudia visited our office one year ago seeking help in restoring her vision which was severely compromised due to corneal transplant surgery in her right eye and advanced keratoconus in her left eye. For many years, prior to visiting our office, Claudia wore soft lenses on both eyes and hard lenses over the soft lenses. This soft-hard lens combination was not stable on her eyes, were very uncomfortable and would often pop out of her eyes. Last year we fit Claudia with GVR Scleral lenses which have allowed her to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably for the first time in many years. This week I examined Claudia again to make sure that her eyes were healthy and stable and that the lenses were still fitting well. This year a small change was made to her right scleral lens which I felt was needed to maintain the health and integrity of her 21 year old transplanted cornea. In the first photo below you can see Claudia's corneal transplant. I feel that this cornea will last Claudia for the rest of her life. The 2nd photo is a profile view of her left keratoconic cornea. For the last year, this cornea has been stable. My feeling is that Claudia will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery in her left eye. I am looking forward to Claudia enjoying her new vision for many years to come.

Transplanted Keratoconus Patient with Hydrops Receives GVR Scleral Lens

In the top photo, I am on the left, our student extern, Jennifer Vicente is on the right and our patient, Maria, is in the center. Maria visited our office recently from Montevideo, Uruguay. In 1977, she underwent corneal transplant surgery in her left eye due to keratoconus. Because her left cornea is so profound, she was not able to tolerate any type of contact lens. Of course, eyeglasses were not able to correct her vision either. For all of these years, this eye was essentially blind without any functional vision. In 2010, this eye developed a condition known as "hydrops". This condition is created when the most posterior corneal membrane tears allowing fluid (aqueous) from within the eye to enter the cornea. When this occurs, the cornea can become cloudy creating additional vision loss. Several weeks ago, we fit this eye with a GVR Scleral lens which is providing clear (20/30) comfortable vision in this eye for the first time in almost 40 years. The 2nd photo below shows a profile view of Maria's left transplanted cornea. Note how far out the center of gravity is. For this reason, the only lens that will allow Maria to see with this eye is a very large scleral lens.The next photo is a frontal view of the scleral lens on Maria's left eye. The last photo is a greatly enlarged image of the lower half of Maria's left transplanted cornea. The curved gray area going around the cornea outlines the junction between the host and donor cornea. Look carefully and you will note a bowl-shaped gray outline extending from about 7:00 O'Clock to the center of the cornea just below the pupil. This is the torn posterior corneal membrane which took place in 2010. I expect Maria to be able to wear her scleral lens comfortably and with excellent vision for many years.

Keratoconus Patient free of Distortions with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient was diagnosed with keratoconus over 20 years ago. Over these years he was fit with a variety of contact lenses, both gas permeable and soft lenses. All of the gas permeable contact lenses given to him were were either uncomfortable or painful. In addition, these lenses would often pop out of his eyes. The specialty soft lenses that he was fit with did not provide him with functional vision. When this patient first visited out office 3 months ago, his uncorrected vision was less than 20/1000 in each eye. With his corrective lenses his vision was less than 20/100. 3 months ago we fit this young man with GVR Scleral lenses which are providing him with clear (20/20 vision in each eye) stable vision without any vision distortions and all day comfortable lens wear. This patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. Information about this unique technology can be found at:www.sclerallens.com.

Keratoconus Patient with Transplant and ALK now 20/25 with GVR Scleral Lens

The young woman in the center of this photo was diagnosed with keratoconus many years ago. In the 1980's she underwent corneal transplant surgery in her right eye. Over the years this patient has had difficulties wearing any type of contact lens to restore quality vision especially in her right eye which is the eye with the transplanted cornea. In 2000, this patient was referred to a internationally renown eye institution where 2 surgical incisions (AK surgery) were placed into the transplanted cornea in an effort to decrease the corneal astigmatism. The surgical incisions in the right transplanted cornea never healed and remained open to this day. The vision in this patient's right eye decreased after this surgery and she continued to experience unstable vision along with frequent eye pain. Last year in an effort to stabilize her corneas she underwent Collagen Cross Linking therapy. When this patient first visited out office 3 months ago, the visual acuity in her right eye was 20/800 and in her left eye 20/250. Over the last 3 months we have been fitting her with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses this patient is corrected to 20/25 vision in each eye. She can now see clearly and comfortably with all day lens wear. In the bottom left photo you can see a profile of her right cornea. The faint grey line is where the host cornea and donor cornea meet. Look carefully toward the bottom of this photo. You will note a curved line within the lower portion of the corneal transplant. This is one of the open incisions placed into this cornea. The bottom right photo is a frontal view of the transplanted cornea. Note the curved line at the top of the photo going from 11:00 O'Clock to 2:00 O'Clock and the curved line at the bottom of the photo going from 6:00 O'Clock to 8:00 O'Clock. These curved lines are the AK or "relaxing" incisions which created many problems for this patient. These incisions are open exposing the internal corneal tissues to the environment and the blinking action of the eyelids. The scleral lenses, in addition to providing vision also are acting to protect the compromised cornea and to keep the cornea in a moist environment. I feel that this patient will be able to wear her scleral lenses comfortably and with clear vision for many years.

Sixteen Year old from Venezula Treated with GVR Scleral Lens

In the photo below standing next to me is a 16 year old boy with advanced keratoconus in both eyes. Standing to his left is his father. They both visited our office from Venezuela. 3 years ago he was diagnosed with keratoconus. Over the last 3 years he was fit with a number of different lenses which either did not correct his vision or were very uncomfortable to wear. When this boy first visited us several weeks ago, the visual acuity in his right eye was less than 20/800 and 20/100 in his left eye. Eyeglasses were not able to provide him with functional vision. This patient's right cornea was so pronounced that "hydrops" developed. This is a condition where the most posterior membrane of the cornea ruptures allowing fluid (aqueous) from inside the eye to enter the center of the cornea creating a cloudy appearance. We fit both of this boy's eyes with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses he is now able to see 20/30 with his right eye and 20/20 with his left eye with all day lens wear and comfort. In his home country he was told that the only solution for his vision loss was to undergo corneal transplant surgery. Just prior to visiting our office, this patient underwent Corneal Cross Linking which is designed to strengthen his corneas. In the photo below, note the haze directly in front of the pupil. This is the "hydrops" created by the ruptured corneal membrane described above. I expect this young boy's corneas to remain stable and seriously doubt that he will ever need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Bullous Keratopathy in Keratoconus Treated with GVR Scleral Lens

The patient standing next to me was diagnosed with keratoconus many years ago. Standing next to her is her husband. When she first visited our office we immediately saw that she had an advanced case of keratoconus. The year before we met her she underwent cataract surgery in both eyes and also Collagen Cross Linking therapy in both eyes. The keratoconus in her left eye was so advanced that the outer cellular layer of her left cornea (the epithelium) was separating from the underlying corneal tissue, a condition known as bullous keratopathy. Over the years this patient was fit with a variety of gas permeable lenses which caused her significant discomfort and often pain. In addition her lenses would often pop out of her eyes at the most inconvenient times. When this patient first visited our office her visual acuity was 20/150 with her corrective lenses. In 2012, we fit both eyes with GVR Scleral lenses which are allowing her to 20/25 with all day comfort. Since we first met this very nice lady, her vision and her corneas have remained stable. I expect her to be able to wear her lenses comfortably and with clear vision for many years to come. In the lower photograph is a profile photo of her left cornea. Both corneas have similar topographies. The center of gravity of this cornea is so far out that any small gas permeable lens placed on its surface will be unstable, uncomfortable and likely pop out. The scleral lenses that we fit her with do not touch her corneas but rather vault over her corneas and rest on the white portion (the sclera) of her eyes. The space between the back surface of the lenses and the front surface of her corneas is filled with unpreserved sterile saline solution so that her dry, irritated corneas will always be in a wet environment.

Young Woman Builds a Future with GVR Scleral Lens

This young woman was diagnosed with an advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes over 10 years ago. She had visited a number of eye doctors over the years including eye doctors and contact lens specialists at a world famous eye institution. When she could not have her vision restored she was told that her only option would be to have corneal transplant surgery. This patient first visited our office 10 years ago. The lenses she was wearing kept popping out of her eyes and were scarring her corneas. We fit this young woman with GVR lenses on her initial visit. Over the years we had to make minor changes to her specialty lenses but she was always able to wear her lenses all day comfortably with clear comfortable vision. We recently fit her with a newly designed GVR Scleral lens which has improved her vision beyond what she was able to achieve before. The corneal scarring has improved over the years with her lenses as has her ocular comfort. Since we first met, this young patient has finished college, gotten married and now has 2 beautiful children and a career. This patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Very Advanced Keratoconus Treated with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient has a very advanced case of keratoconus in his right eye and was diagnosed with this condition 5 years before visiting our office. Over the years he had visited a number of doctors and eye clinics seeking help. Regular contact lenses were either painful to wear or were unable to provide him with clear vision. Prior to visiting our specialty practice he was told that the only option left for him was corneal transplant surgery in the right eye. 3 years ago we fit his right eye with a GVR Scleral lens. This lens has provided this patient's right eye with clear (20/20) comfortable vision with all day lens wear. For the last 3 years both of his corneas (he wears a soft lens on his left eye) are clear and stable. In my opinion, this patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Intacs and X-Linking Patient Now 20/20 in Each Eye with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient has very advanced keratoconus in both eyes. 4 years ago he visited us from Mexico seeking a solution to his vision loss and to avoid a scheduled corneal transplant operation. When he first came into our office his corrected visual acuity with his eyeglasses was very poor. He had been unable to see clearly with any type of contact lenses. The gas permeable lenses given to him were very uncomfortable and unstable and would often pop out of his eyes. We fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which provided him with clear (20/20 in each eye) and comfortable vision with all day lens wear. Over 2 years ago, this patient visited another doctor for Intacs surgery and Collagen Cross-linking therapy. He was under the impression that these 2 procedures would "cure" his keratoconus and eliminate his need to wear the scleral lenses we provided him. Last month this patient returned to our office for a comprehensive eye and lens evaluation. Both of his corneas were clear and healthy. The shape and contour of his corneas were essentially the same as they were 4 years ago as was the status of his keratoconus. The GVR scleral lens design was changed slightly and dispensed to him last week. With his new lenses this patient is still seeing clearly and comfortably. Next to the photo of me and this patient, I posted a photo of the scleral lens over his cornea with the Intacs. Note the "horse-shoe" shape structure just below the pupil. This is a plastic ring (Intacs) that was surgically inserted into the center of the cornea. Both of his corneas look the same. The principle behind this technology is to make the distorted cornea smoother and less irregular. Unfortunately, Intacs does not provide the same therapeutic benefit to every patient. As long as this patient wears his GVR Scleral lenses he will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Internationally Known Author Bill Cortright 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me and internationally renown author and speaker Bill Cortright. Bill is an expert in the field of wellness, anti-aging, weight loss and stress management and is the author of the best seller "The Stress Response Diet." Bill was diagnosed with an advanced case of keratoconus by us about 8 years ago. Prior to visiting us, he was provided with a number of soft and rigid contact lenses which were not able to provide him with functional vision. All of the lenses provided to him prior to his initial visit with us were very uncomfortable and unstable on his eyes. At his initial visit, his corrected visual acuity was 20/60 with his right eye and less than 20/800 with his left eye. The keratoconus in his left eye is so advanced that no spectacle or contact lens was able to provide any semblance of functional vision. 8 years ago we fit both of this patient's eyes with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses, Bill has been able to see clearly (20/20 vision in each eye) and comfortably with all day lens wear. Over the past 8 years, Bill's eyes and corneas have remained stable and clear. It is my feeling that Bill will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient Stable at 20/20 with Clear, Comfortable Vision

This patient first visited our office 18 months ago from Santiago, Chile. In the 1970's this patient underwent corneal transplant surgery in both eyes due to keratoconus. About 8 years ago he noted that his vision began to deteriorate and eye glasses were not able to provide him with functional vision. When this patient first came to see us, his corrected visual acuity was less than 20/50 (with distortions) with his eye glasses. Over the years he was not able to wear contact lenses. 18 months ago we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which enabled him to see clearly (20/20 without distortions) and comfortably with all day lens wear. The first evening he was with his new lenses, he went to a major tennis tournament here in Miami. He recently told me that it was the first time in many years that he was able to see the tennis ball in play clearly. Prior to that evening, he never saw a tennis ball in play. Over the last 18 months, this patient's vision and corneas have remained stable. Today he told me that he feels better with his lenses on than without having his lenses on. This patient will be able to wear his GVR lenses clearly and comfortably for many, many years to come.

Keratoconus Patient now 20/20 with the GVR Scleral Lens

This young man was diagnosed with keratoconus in 2005. Over the years he visited a number of eye clinics and eye doctors seeking help with his vision. He was unable to see clearly with any eyeglasses provided to him. In addition, none the of the soft lenses that were given him provided him with functional vision. All of the gas permeable lenses that he received over the years were extremely uncomfortable, were constantly moving on his eyes and would often pop out. In an effort to stabilize his corneas and to avoid a corneal transplant, this young man underwent Collagen Cross-Linking earlier this year. Last month, this patient visited our office for the first time. When this patient first came in, his visual acuity was 20/40 in his right eye and less than 20/200 in his left eye. We fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have allowed him to see clearly (20/20 in each eye) and comfortably with all day lens wear for the first time in over 10 years. This patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconous Patients Goes From 20/800 to 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This young man was diagnosed with keratoconus about 10 years ago. Over the last 10 years he tried wearing various contact lens designs and eyeglasses without success. Last year, in an effort to improve his vision and prevent progression of his keratoconus, he underwent Collagen Cross-linking in his right eye. Earlier this year he had Collagen Cross-linking done to his left eye. This young man first visited out office one month ago. When he first came in to see us, the visual acuity in his right eye was less than 20/800 and in his left eye 20/40. Since this patient was a little boy, he always wanted to be a police officer but had little hope of accomplishing this goal due to his vision disability. Last month we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have allowed him to see 20/20 in each eye without any distortions and with all day comfort. He recently passed his police entrance physical and is now waiting to receive notification about an entrance date into the police academy. For the first time in 10 years, this young man has clear 20/20 vision and will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery or any other invasive ocular surgeries.

Intacs Patient now 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This young man has suffered from advanced keratoconus in both eyes for many years. After he was diagnosed with keratoconus, he tried wearing eyeglasses and many different types of contact lenses, all unsuccessfully. Because of his poor vision, he found it extremely difficult to continue his studies at a local college. In an effort to make his corneas less irregular and more stable, he underwent Intacs surgery in 2009. Intacs are plastic rings that are inserted into the center of the front surface of the eye, the cornea. The Intacs, however, did not improve his vision. The top photo is of this very special patient and me. The lower photo shows the plastic rings (Intacs)located in the center of his right cornea. In 2010, we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses this young man was able to see clearly (20/20 vision without any distortions) and comfortably with all day lens wear. This was the first time in many years that this young man was able to see so clear. Earlier this month, this patient was examined once again. His corneas have remained healthy and stable over the years. However, because of a normal vision change, a new pair of GVR Scleral lenses were provided to him. Since this patient's first visit to my office, he re-enrolled in college, got married and has 2 beautiful children. In addition, he has a new profession which he loves. This patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient from Chile 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

The photo below is of a young woman with advanced keratoconus in both eyes and of her husband on the left. They both traveled from Santiago, Chile seeking help in restoring her vision. For many years she suffered from dry eyes along with blurred, distorted vision. Over the years she was fit with a variety of contact lenses, including scleral lenses which were not only uncomfortable but were unable to provide her with functional vision. Eyeglasses were not able to provide this patient with functional vision. Last week we fit this young woman with GVR Scleral lenses which for the first time in many years are allowing her to see not only clearly (20/20 vision in each eye) but also comfortably with all day lens wear. For many years she was fearful of needing to receive corneal transplants in both eyes. With the vision and comfort she is now experiencing, this young woman will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient from Gautemala 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me along with my keratoconus patient on the right and her sister on the left. This patient first visited our practice from Guatemala about 10 years ago. Before visiting us, she had been unable to tolerate any type of contact lenses. Eyeglasses were not able to provide her with functional vision. 10 years ago we fit this patient with GVR gas permeable lenses. For the past 10 years she has traveled every year from Guatemala to Miami to have her eyes and specialty lenses examined. Over these years her corneas have remained stable and her vision has remained clear (20/20). In addition, she has been able to wear her lenses all day comfortably. Before coming here 10 years ago, doctors in Guatemala told her that she will eventually need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. After examining this very special patient this past week and noting how stable and clear her corneas have remained, I can confidently say that she will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery or any other invasive surgery.

Mother and Daughter with Keratoconus Receive GVR Scleral Lenses

This is a photo of me along with a mother and daughter who traveled from Lima, Peru to visit us. The mother (center) had a corneal transplant in her right eye over 20 years ago and has an advanced case of keratoconus in her left eye. The young woman on the right is this patient's daughter who has an advanced case of keratoconus and is trying to avoid corneal transplant surgery. Prior to visiting us, the mother was wearing soft lenses on both corneas and gas permeable lenses over the soft lenses. Her lenses were not stable on her corneas, would often pop out of her eyes and were very uncomfortable. Last week we provided the mother with GVR Scleral lenses which are allowing her to see clearly (20/20 vision) and comfortably with all day lens wear for the first time in many years. When we examined the daughter, she was not wearing any corrective lenses. She told us that she was not able to tolerate any lenses whatsoever. The visual acuity that we measured on this young woman when she first came in was less than 20/400. She also told us that she was driving this way. We fit the daughter with GVR Scleral lenses which are allowing this young woman to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably with all day lens wear once again. I don't think that the mother or daughter will ever need to undergo corneal transplant surgery

Keratoconus Patient from Chile Avoids Transplant with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient visited our office from Santiago, Chile. For many years she had been struggling with an advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes. When she first came to see us, she was wearing a gas permeable lens on her left eye only. This left lens gave her functional vision but was uncomfortable as it was rubbing on the apex of her cone. Her right cornea was so advanced that she could not tolerate any rigid contact lens. In an effort to avoid a corneal transplant in her right eye, she came to see us. Last week we fit both of this patient's keratoconic corneas with GVR Scleral lenses. Now for the first time in many years she is able to see clearly (20/20 vision in both eyes) and comfortably with all day lens wear. Because these lenses do not touch her corneas but envelope both corneas in a liquid environment, her eyes will be comfortable and her vision stable. This patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient with Ferra Rings now 20/20 in Each Eye

This young man recently visited our office from Santiago, Chile for his yearly eye and visual examination. When he was 14 years old, he was diagnosed with keratoconus. Eyeglasses and conventional contact lenses were unable to provide him with functional vision. 7 years ago he underwent Collagen Cross-linking in both eyes in an attempt to stabilize his corneas. In addition, Ferrara rings (similar to Intacs) were surgically implanted into the center of his left cornea which reduced to amount of corneal distortion. 6 years ago we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses this young man was able to see clearly (20/20 in each eye) and comfortably for the first time in many years. In the photo below you can see the Ferrara rings which were designed to decrease the intensity of his keratoconus. Over the past 6 years, this young man was seen by us on 4 separate occasions for eye, vision and scleral lens examinations. Over these years, his corneas have remained clear and stable and his keratoconus has not progressed. In addition he has been able to maintain 20/20 vision during this time period. I expect this patient to be able to wear his GVR Scleral lenses well into the distant future and I feel confident to write that he will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient with Scarring Continues to Do Well With GVR Scleral Lens

This patient was diagnosed with keratoconus 20 years prior to visiting our practice. She was first diagnosed in India and while there visited a number of doctors who prescribed gas permeable lenses. Over many years she wore lenses that rubbed against the apex of her corneal cones which caused extensive scarring and pain. In 2009, this patient underwent Corneal Cross linking. The purpose of Corneal Cross linking was to stabilize her corneas. In 2011, we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have provided her with clear, comfortable vision and all day lens wear. She recently visited our office for her yearly examination. Both corneas have remained stable and the scarring on her corneas is much less pronounced than when she first came to see us. This young woman will always be able to see clearly with her lenses and will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Student with Keratoconus Receives GVR Scleral Lens

This young man was diagnosed with keratoconus about 10 years ago. Both of his corneas have become increasingly more distorted and pronounced over the years. Last year, in an effort of avoid needing corneal transplant surgery, he underwent Collagen Cross-linking in both eyes. The keratoconus in his left cornea progressed to the point that the innermost corneal membrane ruptured causing liquid from inside the eye to enter the center of the cornea. This condition is called "hydrops". Note the cloudy appearance in the photo below. This is due to the hydrops. This patient's vision cannot be corrected with eyeglasses or conventional contact lenses. Earlier this year we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses, this young man can see clearly and comfortably with all day wear. Next month, this patient will be entering medical school. I expect him to continue to do well with his scleral lenses. He will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery as his corneas have stabilized and have remained clear.

Keratoconus Patient Diagnosed 40 years ago Receives GVR Scleral Lens

This patient was diagnosed with keratoconus in the early 1960's. 40 years ago he received a corneal transplant in his right eye and 20 years ago received a corneal transplant in his left eye. For 32 years he wore gas permeable lenses. While he was able to see relatively well with these lenses, they were painful to wear and would pop out of his eyes numerous times each day. Notice the profile photos of his corneas below. His transplanted corneas are so profound and the center of gravity is so far out that any gas permeable contact lens will not be stable on his eyes. 8 years ago we provided this patient with GVR Scleral lenses. These lenses are able to vault over the transplanted corneas and come to rest on the white portion of his eyes (the sclera). Because these lenses fit nicely under his eyelids and don't move, they are unable to be dislodged with normal eye movements. The interface between the back surface of the lenses and the front surface of the corneas is filled with sterile saline solution. In other words, his corneas are always in a liquid environment. This patient has been able to wear his lenses all day comfortably for over 8 years with excellent vision. Over these years, his corneas have remained clear and stable and have maintained their integrity.

Advanced Keratoconus Patient 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient was diagnosed with an advanced case of keratoconus over 10 years ago. Over the years he visited a number of doctors who fit him with a variety of gas permeable lenses, hybrid lenses and soft lenses. None of the lenses that were provided him were able to give him functional vision along with good comfort. In 2013, we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses he was able to see clearly (20/20) during the day and at night with all day comfort. Last month this patient returned for his annual eye and vision examination. At this examination, both eyes were clear and he was still able to see clearly (20/20) with his GVR lenses with all day comfort. No changes were needed to be made to his lenses which were 2 years old. This patient will always be able to wear his lenses comfortably and will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery or any other invasive procedures.

Keratoconus Patient with Hydrops Receives GVR Scleral Lens

The patient in this photo was diagnosed with advanced keratoconus over 30 years ago. For many years she visited a number of eye doctors trying to get fit with contact lenses that she could wear comfortably with clear vision. Four years ago she developed this bright white spot in her right cornea. She visited doctors at several world famous eye institutions who told her that the only treatment was corneal transplant surgery. The white spot is a condition called "hydrops." This conditions develops when the most posterior corneal membrane tears due to internal pressures within the eye outward into the weakened, thinned out cornea. When this event takes place, fluid (aqueous) from within the eye enters the center of the cornea and can give the cornea a milky or opaque white appearance. In this instance, the clear cornea in front of the pupil was spared and therefore a corneal transplant was not necessary. Last year we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which are providing this patient with clear, comfortable stable vision with all day lens wear. The photo below shows the opaque white area in this patient's cornea which is the hydrops. As long as this patient wears her GVR Scleral lenses she will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient with Fusarium Scar Doing well with GVR Scleral Lens

The patient in this photo was diagnosed with keratoconus over 25 years ago. She was originally fit with soft contact lenses which did not provide her with quality vision. About 10 years ago she developed an extremely rare fungal infection in one eye known as Fusarium Keratitis. The Fusarium fungus resided in a contaminated soft contact lens solution. This fungal infection left her with a permanent scar adjacent to the visual axis (i.e. her pupil). Once the eye had healed, this cornea became even more irregular than before the infection. In an effort to avoid a corneal transplant, this patient was referred to our office. 9 years ago we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have provided this patient with clear, stable comfortable vision with all day wear. Over the years, her corneas have been clear and stable. This patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. The photo below shows the GVR Scleral lens over the cornea with the Fusarium scar.

Keratoconus Patient Facing Transplant Receives Scleral Lenses, Seeing Well

This patient was diagnosed with keratoconus at a very young age over 20 years ago. Over these years he had no functional vision in his left eye and blurred vision in the right eye which was partially corrected with conventional contact lenses. For over 20 years he was unable to find an eye doctor who could improve the vision in his left eye so that his 2 eyes could function together under binocular conditions. Doctors at a world famous eye institution told him that his only option was to have a corneal transplant in his left eye. Last year we examined this patient and fit him with GVR Scleral lenses. He now has clear, stable functional vision in both eyes with all day lens wear. His vision and eyes have been stable and I don't feel that he will ever need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient with Intacs Removed Seeing Well with GVR Scleral Lens

The woman in the photo has suffered loss of vision due to an advanced case of keratoconus which was diagnosed over 25 years ago. For many years she was unable to obtain functional vision with either eyeglasses or contact lenses. About 8 years ago she underwent Intacs surgery in both eyes in an attempt to improve her vision. Intacs are small plastic rings which are surgically inserted into the center of the cornea in an attempt to smooth out the corneal surface. In the case of this patient, the Intacs did not work out well. A year after undergoing Intacs surgery, these plastic rings were removed due to an inflammatory response in her corneas. She then underwent a Collagen Cross linking procedure which is designed to strengthen her corneas and to stabilize them. None of these procedures improved her vision. 6 years ago this patient visited our office for a comprehensive examination. It was at this visit that we fit her with GVR Scleral lenses. With her GVR lenses, this patient has been seeing clearly and comfortably with all day lens wear. Her corneas are stable as is her vision for the past 6 years.

Keratoconus Patient from Santiago, Chile 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

The young woman in this photo visited us from Santiago, Chile. For many years she has had poor vision due to advanced keratoconus.Over the years she tried unsuccessfully to wear soft lenses and various gas permeable lens designs. When she first came to visit us, her vision with her eye glasses was less than 20/200. In addition, she was unable function visually at night and in low light environments. Last year we fit this young woman with GVR Scleral lenses. With her scleral lenses she has clear (20/20) undistorted vision both at night and indoors. In addition, she is able to wear her lenses all day with excellent comfort. We examined this patient last week. Her corneas have remained stable and healthy since the first day that she began wearing these unique lenses. As long as she wears these health promoting lenses, this patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery or any other invasive corneal surgeries.

Patients Diagnosed with Keratoconus 45 years ago Receives GVR Scleral Lenses

The patient in the center of this photo was diagnosed with keratoconus 45 years ago. Over these many years he visited many eye doctors and eye clinics seeking help. After being fit with many different types of hard, hybrid and soft contact lenses he visited a world famous eye institution where he was told that he needed to undergo corneal transplant surgery in both eyes. Last month we fit him with GVR Scleral lenses. Now for the first time in many years he can see clearly and comfortably both at near and at far without any visual distortions. As long as he is able to wear his GVR Scleral lenses this patient will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. Today, this patient told us "These lenses are life changing." The young woman on the left is our student extern, Tina Cheung who will become an eye doctor before the end of May, 2015.

Post-Intacs and X-Linking Patient 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This young man was diagnosed with an advanced case of keratoconus while in high school. After finding it difficult to function with eyeglasses and contact lenses he underwent Intacs surgery and Collagen Cross Linking. Intacs are small round plastic rings that surgically inserted into the cornea in an effort to make the cornea have a more rounded shape. The Collagen Cross Linking is done to strengthen the cornea and to prevent progression of the keratoconus. These two procedures were done about 4 years ago. Three years ago, we fit this patient with gas permeable GVR Scleral lenses which have allowed him to see 20/20 in each eye for the first time in many years. He is able to wear his GVR lenses all day comfortably. In addition, his vision is stable and his eyes have maintained their health since receiving his lenses.

Keratoconus Patient from Argentina 20/20 and 20/25 with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient has a very advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes and visited us from Buenos Aires, Argentina seeking help. Back home he was fit with small gas permeable lenses which kept of popping out of his eyes and causing him great distress. Because his left cornea is so much more profound, he gave up wearing any type of contact lens on his left eye and functioned with only one contact lens. In Argentina, he was given only 2 choices: hard contact lenses or corneal transplant surgery. In 2013, both of this patients eyes were fit with GVR Scleral lenses. With these lenses he is able to see 20/20 with his right eye and 20/25 with his left eye. This past week he went through a yearly examination in our office. Both of his eyes and corneas have remained stable and he has been able to maintain stable, clear and comfortable vision with all day lens wear. In my opinion, he will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

"Global Cone" Fit with 20/30 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of a specific type of keratoconic cornea known as a "Global Cone". This type of keratoconus involves the entire corneal surface unlike other forms of keratoconus that involve smaller sections of the cornea. Because this cornea is so profound and irregular, conventional gas permeable lenses placed on this eye will pop out or create a great deal of pain. Soft contact lenses will not allow this eye to provide functional vision. Several years ago, we fit this eye with a large highly oxygen permeable GVR Scleral lens. With the GVR lens this eye provides this patient with 20/30 vision. Without this lens, the best spectacle correction is about 20/800. This patient is able to wear her GVR Scleral lens comfortably for all of her waking hours.

Pilot with Keratoconus Seeing Well with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of student intern Tina Cheung with a patient with advanced keratoconus. This patient is an airline pilot who was diagnosed with keratoconus many years ago. He had been wearing gas permeable lenses which allowed him to see clearly but were becoming increasingly more uncomfortable. Wind in his eyes, dust and debris had become significant comfort issues. Earlier this year we refit both eyes with GVR Scleral lenses. He is now seeing clearly and comfortably once again with all day wear.

Keratoconus Patient Seeing Well with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient was diagnosed with keratoconus 20 years prior to the time this photo was taken. Over the years he visited many doctors who provided him with many types of eyeglasses and contact lenses none of which allowed him to see clearly and comfortably. His left cornea is so debilitated that he was encouraged to undergo corneal transplant surgery in this eye. Last year we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have provided him with clear (20/20 right eye and 20/30 left eye) stable comfortable vision. For the past year his eyes have been stable and his keratoconus has not progressed. I don't feel that he will ever need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patients now 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient has an advanced keratoconic right eye and a transplanted cornea on his left eye. Both corneas are so distorted that he barely functions with his eyeglasses. Over the years he was fit with a variety of contact lenses which he could not tolerate. He was contemplating having a corneal transplant in his right eye before visiting our office. Last year we examined this young man and fit him with GVR Scleral lenses. With his GVR Scleral lenses he is able to see clearly (20/20) once again with all day comfort. It is interesting to know that prior to receiving these lenses, his eyes were red most of the time and he suffered from periodic eye pain. Since receiving these lenses his eyes are no longer red and he no longer suffers from any eye pain or discomfort.

Physician with Keratoconus from Chile Now 20/20 with Scleral Lenses

This patient is a physician with an advanced case of keratoconus who came to us from Santiago, Chile. Prior to coming here, her vision was so compromised that she found it extremely difficult to take care of her patients. Conventional contact lenses and eyeglasses did not provide her with the visual acuity she needed to do her job. In addition, all of her prior contact lenses were extremely uncomfortable. Last year we provided her with GVR Scleral lenses. She recently returned for her yearly examination. For the past year she has had clear, stable 20/20 vision and has been able to wear her lenses all day comfortably. Prior to coming here she was contemplating having corneal transplant surgery. Her corneas have been stable over the past year and she will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient Receives 20/20 Vision with Scleral Lenses

This patient has suffered loss of vision and comfort due to keratoconus. For many years he was given soft contact lenses to use. The soft lenses provided blurred, distorted and unstable vision. In addition, his eyes were always red. Eyeglasses were unable to provide functional vision. 2 years ago we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have provided him with clear (20/20) stable comfortable vision with all day wear. In addition, his eyes are no longer red.

Keratoconus Patient from Iraq now 20/20 with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with Ali, a patient with advanced keratoconus who came to see us from Baghdad, Iraq. Ali has been suffering from blurred and distorted vision for many years. Since his non-surgical options for vision improvement is very limited in Iraq, he traveled to Europe seeking help. While in Baghdad, he was told that corneal transplant surgery was his only choice. In December, Ali visited our office for the first time. We fit him with GVR Scleral lenses which are now allowing him to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably once again without distorted vision and with all day wear. Ali will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoconus Patient Facing Transplant Receives Scleral Lenses Instead

This patient has advanced keratoconus in both eyes. About 4 years ago she visited an internationally renown eye institution seeking proper treatment. While there she was told that her only option was corneal transplant surgery in both eyes as her condition was too advanced for contact lenses. Prior to this she had been wearing contact lenses but they were very painful and her vision was unstable. 4 years ago we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have provided her with clear (20/20) stable, comfortable vision with all day wear. Over the past 4 years her keratoconus has not progressed nor will it. Prior to wearing these unique lenses, this patient's life was defined by keratoconus. Not any longer. She is now living a normal visual life and functioning on the same level as those of us who do not have keratoconus.

Keratoconus Patient from Mexico 20/20 with Scleral Lenses

This patient recently visited our office from Vera Cruz, Mexico. For many years she suffered vision loss due to keratoconus. The doctors who she visited in Mexico had told her that she needed either corneal transplant surgery or Intacs surgery. Conventional contact lenses were very uncomfortable and she was unable to function with eyeglasses due to the blurred, distorted vision that eyeglasses provided. 4 years ago this patient first visited our office. At that time we fit her with GVR Scleral lenses. Over the years she has returned for periodic follow-up care. She has been able to see clearly (20/20 vision) with both eyes, with stable, comfortable vision with all day lens wear. In addition, this patient will never need corneal transplant or Intacs surgery. For the past 4 years her eyes have remained stable.

College Student with Keratoconus Receives Scleral Lenses

This young man is a 3rd year college student with an advanced case of keratoconus. For many years he suffered pain from ill-fitting contact lenses. Conventional contact lenses and eyeglasses were not able to provide him with functional vision.Two years ago he had Collagen Cross-linking done to strengthen his corneas. Shortly thereafter he visited our office. We fit both eyes with GVR Scleral lenses which have provided him with stable clear vision with all day comfort.

Keratoconus Patient from Chile Receives Scleral Lenses

This is a photo of me, student intern David Yoo and a patient with advanced keratoconus who visited our office from Santiago, Chile. For many years this patient suffered ocular pain and blurred vision from poorly fit gas permeable lenses. To minimize the pain in his eyes he would always be squinting and blinking as little as possible. In addition, both corneas were scarred from his prior lenses. Last month we examined this patient and provided him with GVR Scleral lenses. His corrected vision is now 20/20 in each eye. He is no longer squinting and is blinking normally. No more pain, no more suffering. Just clear comfortable vision all day long.

Keratoconus Patient Advised to Get Transplant Receives Scleral Lens Instead

This patient was diagnosed with keratoconus in 1956. Over the years his keratoconus progressed and was advised by 6 corneal specialists over a 50 year period that he needed to have corneal transplant surgery done in both eyes. He was fit with many different types of contact lenses which caused extreme discomfort and corneal scarring. 8 years ago, we fit this patient with GVR Scleral lenses which have provided him with clear, comfortable and stable vision with all day wear. He never underwent corneal transplant surgery and I doubt that he every will. By the way, his vision without his GVR Scleral lenses is less than 20/2000. With these lenses his visual acuity is 20/30.

Sixteen Year old with Keratoconus treated with GVR Scleral Lens

This 16 year old girl visited us from Grand Cayman Island. She has a very advanced case of keratoconus in both eyes with the left eye being significantly more advanced. When she first entered our office her visual acuity was less than 20/200 in her right eye. With her left eye she could only count fingers at a 6 inch distance. This young girl was diagnosed with keratoconus 2 years prior to visiting us. Several months prior to her visit she underwent Collagen Cross Linking. Over the last few years she was unable to tolerate either hybrid lenses or gas permeable contact lenses. We recently fit her with GVR Scleral lenses which are allowing her to see 20/20 with her right eye and 20/25 with her left eye. She has all day comfort with stable vision in all lighting conditions.

Keratoconus treated with GVR Scleral Lens

This patient was diagnosed with an advanced case of keratoconus over 20 years ago. For most of these years he wore small rigid gas permeable lenses that irritated his corneas and provided poor vision. Four years ago his left cornea became severely scarred and he could no longer wear any lens on that eye. Four years ago he was fit with GVR scleral lenses which have provided him with clear (20/20 vision), comfortable vision with all day wear. Over the last four years the scarring in his left cornea has cleared significantly and the vision in his left eye has improved to 20/20.

Astrid's Keratoconus addressed with Scleral Lens, 20/20 Result

This is a photo of me with Astrid, my keratoconus patient who has been visiting our practice annually for many years from Guatemala. Besides having an advanced case of keratoconus, Astrid is extremely nearsighted and has been unable to function with eyeglasses or conventional contact lenses. Before ever coming to Miami, Astrid felt that her visual life had come to an end. Astrid was unable to do most of the activities that we all take for granted such as driving and playing the sport she loved so much which is tennis. About 10 years ago we fit Astrid with GVR lenses which restored clear (20/20) undistorted, comfortable vision to her once again. She is now able to do all of the activities she was unable to do before before traveling to Miami. Before coming here, Astrid was fearful that she would need corneal transplant surgery. Over the years, Astrid's eyes, corneas and vision have remained stable. She is able to wear her lenses comfortably all of her waking hours. Astrid will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Eye Pain due to Keratoconus Addressed with GVR Scleral Lens

This is a photo of me with my very special patient, Captain Juan Fernandez, United States Marine Corp (Retired). Captain Fernandez served 2 tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan while suffering ocular pain due to a severe case of keratoconus in both eyes. During the last few years of his service in the military, Captain Fernandez' ocular condition worsened. In order to function while serving overseas, he wore "piggy back" lenses, that is soft lenses on his corneas with hard lenses over the soft lenses. Captain Fernandez told me that with these lenses he was always in pain. It was very difficult for him to keep his eyes open and he was always extremely light sensitive. Prior to retiring from the Marine Corp. Captain Fernandez entered the "Wounded Warrior Battalion" and was placed on the corneal transplant wait list. Before being placed on this wait list, Captain Fernandez had Intacs surgery in both eyes. The Intacs did not improve his vision or reduce his eye pain. While waiting for the corneal transplant, Captain Fernandez told me that due to the severity of the eye pain and light sensitivity he was forced to live in virtual darkness for 2 years. 2 weeks prior to his scheduled visit for corneal transplant surgery, Captain Fernandez visited our office in 2011. At this visit we fit Captain Fernandez with GVR Scleral lenses. After receiving his scleral lenses, Captain Fernandez was able to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably once again for the first time in many years. Today, Captain Fernandez told me that when he walked out of my office for the first time with his scleral lenses he noted an ant of the ground and dew on a tree and was able to see for the first time in 2 years his children's faces. Captain Fernandez' eyes and vision have remained clear and stable for the last 5 years. He is no longer in pain and has no light sensitivity with his lenses on. He will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. Helping Captain Fernandez see clearly and comfortably once again has been one of the highlights of my professional career.

Advanced Keratoconus 20/20 with GVR scleral lens

This is a photo of me with Anthony, a patient with a very advanced case of keratoconus. Anthony was diagnosed with keratoconus many years ago. Over the years he was unable to wear any type of contact lens comfortably. With all of the lenses that Anthony was given prior to visiting our office, he was either able to see clearly but with great discomfort, or have excellent comfort but with poor vision. None of Anthony's prior lenses gave him excellent vision while at the same time giving him good comfort. 7 years ago we fit Anthony with GVR lenses. For about 4 years he was able to see clearly and comfortably. Several years ago, Anthony's left eye developed a condition known as "hydrops". This is a condition that develops when the most posterior corneal membrane ruptures allowing fluid within the eye to enter the cornea creating a cloudy appearance. This condition can occur when the pressures within the eye against the weakened cornea causes a break in Descemet's membrane, the most posterior corneal membrane. When this condition occurred, Anthony's visual acuity decreased from 20/20 to 20/70. About 8 months ago, Anthony received a corneal transplant in this eye. We refit Anthony's eye with a GVR Scleral lens which is now providing Anthony with clear (20/20) comfortable vision once again. In the first photo below, note the cloudy appearance in Anthony's cornea. This is how his left cornea appeared prior to corneal transplant surgery. The grey-white dagger shaped appearance in the center of the cornea is the torn membrane mentioned above. The last photo shows Anthony's transplanted cornea.

Keratoconus followed by Vitrectomy

This is a photo of Ignacio, a patient with an advanced case of keratoconus, who visited our office from Santiago, Chile recently. I am standing on Ignacio's right. Our student extern, Jenna Adelsberger, in on Ignacio's left side. Ignacio first visited our office 2 years ago at which time we fit both of Ignacio's eyes with GVR Scleral lenses. Prior to visiting our office, Ignacio had been wearing soft lenses which did not provide him with functional vision. In addition to keratoconus, Ignacio suffered a detached retina in his left eye due to an accident about 5 years ago. To repair the detached retina, a vitrectomy was performed on this eye. A vitrectomy involves the removal of the bulk of the interior contents of the eye (the vitreous) and replacing it with saline solution. After examining Ignacio recently a small change was made to his left scleral lens. With scleral lenses, Ignacio has 20/20 vision with his right eye and 20/30 vision with his left eye. In addition, Ignacio is able to wear his scleral lenses comfortably all of his waking hours. Prior to visiting our office 2 years ago, Ignacio's corrected vision with his soft lenses was about 20/80. Without correction, Ignacio's visual acuity is counting fingers at a 6 inch distance. I expect Ignacio to be able to wear his scleral lenses comfortably and with clear vision for many years to come.

Keratoconus, Patient from Chile

This is a photo of me with my very special patient Karina on my left and her mother, Cecilia on my right. Karina and her mother visited us last week from Santiago, Chile. A number of years ago Karina was diagnosed with keratoconus in both eyes with her left eye being very advanced. She was told by doctors in her country that she needed to have a corneal transplant in her left eye. 2 years ago, an ophthalmologist in Santiago suggested that she visit our office for a scleral lens consultation. When we first met Karina 2 years ago, she was able to wear a soft lens in her right eye but conventional soft or gas permeable lenses were not able to provide her with functional vision in her left eye. At that time, we fit Karina's left eye with a GVR Scleral lens which provided her left eye with clear (20/20) stable comfortable vision with all day wear. This past week we examined Karina's eyes and vision once again. Over the past 2 years her corneas changed slightly. This time we refit both eyes with GVR Scleral lenses which once again are allowing Karina to see clearly (20/20) and comfortably. The lower photo is a profile view of Karina's left keratoconic cornea. Karina's corneas are stable. Karina will never need to undergo corneal transplant surgery. I am looking forward to seeing Karina and her mother once again in the not too distant future. For more information about this unique technology please visitwww.sclerallens.com.

GVR Scleral Lens over Advanced Keratoconus

This is a photo of an eye with an advanced keratoconus. Over this cornea there is a GVR Scleral lens. The milky-white haze in the center of the cornea is a condition known as hydrops. This occurs when the cornea is so profound that the most posterior layer of the cornea tears as a result of the pressures within the eye. Conventional contact lenses or eyeglasses will not allow this eye to see clearly. With the GVR Scleral lens, this eye has 20/30 vision. Without this lens, this eye has less than 20/800 vision.

GVR Scleral Lens: From 20/800 to 20/20

This is a photo of a GVR Scleral lens on an eye with advanced keratoconus. With this lens, this eye can see clearly (20/20) with all day lens wear. Without this lens, the best vision that this eye can attain is less than 20/800.

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EyePrint Pro

EyePrintPro technology creates a scleral lens based on a mold of the cornea. The molding is accurate to 1 or 2 microns and fits perfectly because it exactly mirrors the irregularities of the individual corneal surface. The technology is well suited for post-Lasik, Keratoconus, RK, eye injury, and corneal transplant patients. Read More in this PDF about EyePrintPro Scleral Lens Technology